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Grilled Mushroom and Radish on Toast

mushroomtoast

Laurie David and I share a love for things on toast. I discovered my obsession with it as I realized that many of the recipes in my weekly videos (visit theperennialplate.com) were things on toast: I’ve done roadkill, morels, bison tartare, backyard eggs and pickled pike (that I had killed while spear/ice fishing). So when Laurie asked me to create a recipe using the mushrooms from Mycopia Organic Mushroom Farm (an impressive operation in Sonoma county) – I knew I had to make something on toast.  Also, I’ve just moved out of my house, so there aren’t many options beyond things on toast.

INGREDIENTS

6 mushrooms
3 spring onions
olive oil
salt
5 radishes and their greens
apple cider vinegar
1 teaspoon toasted fennel seed
honey

TO PREPARE

Cut the mushrooms into quarters, or halves. You want them big enough that they won’t fall through the slots in your grill, but small enough so that all sides can get some nice color. Also, toss the spring onions in the olive oil and salt as well. Place both on a hot grill, flip so that all sides get some color, then move to the edge of the grill so they cook through without getting burned. 

When cooked through (taste to tell if they are done!) – remove from the grill. Dice the spring onions (remove the outer skin if it is too charred) and cut the mushrooms into thinner slices while still retaining their shape.

Meanwhile take the radish leaves/stems and mince as fine as you can. Radish stems are delicious and much more nutritious than the radish itself. While the mushrooms are still warm, toss together the minced stems, the spring onions and a salt to taste, along with another splash of olive oil.  

Thinly slice the radishes, toss with olive oil and a bit of apple cider vinegar, a tiny bit of honey and some salt.  

Take a piece of bread, splash a little olive oil on it and put it on the grill until it gets a bit crisp.  Pile on the mushrooms followed by the radish. Eat it as passed appetizer, breakfast, lunch or dinner. Serve it with a salad or a fried egg, eat it outside in the sun.

 

About Daniel Klein

After learning to cook at his mother’s bed and breakfast, Daniel went on to work and train at many of the world’s top restaurants.   His culinary education brought him to Spain, France, England, India and New York, where he has worked and trained at top Michelin starred restaurants including The Fat Duck (Heston Blumenthal), St. John (Fergus Henderson), Mugaritz (Andoni Luis Aduriz), Bouchon (Thomas Keller), Applewood (David Shea) and Craft (Tom Collichio). After graduating from NYU, Daniel also pursued a career in film. He has directed, filmed, edited and produced projects on various issues including the development industry in Africa and oil politics. Daniel’s most recent film “What are We Doing Here?” has aired on TV, in theaters and at numerous festivals around the world.

The Perennial Plate is an online weekly documentary series dedicated to socially responsible and adventurous eating. The episodes follow the culinary, agricultural and hunting explorations of chef and activist, Daniel Klein. Season One took place over a calendar year in Minnesota where very Monday for 52 weeks, Klein and cameragirl Mirra Fine released short films about good food. In Season Two, Klein will be traveling across America, taking the viewer on a journey to appreciate and understand where good food comes from and how to enjoy it. Starting on May 9th, the weekly videos will continue, bringing the audience along for stories of urban gardens, long drives, blood, hunting and guts.

 

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